Social Security Disability Insurance Attorney in Nashville

Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) are two federal programs put in place to provide help to those with disabilities in America. The Social Security Administration (SSA) pays SSDI benefits to you and some of your family members if you have insurance, while SSI benefits are paid based solely on financial need.
To qualify for SSA insurance, you must have worked for at least five of the last 10 years and consistently paid taxes for Social Security. If this doesn’t sound like you, you may still qualify for SSI if you can prove enough of a financial need. Your assets cannot exceed $2,000 if you’re single and $3,000 if you’re married. You also need to have total disability – not partial or short-term disability – to qualify for SSI benefits.

Am I Eligible for SSDI?

To be eligible for SSDI, you first have to prove that you suffer from a permanent disability that prevents you from ever returning to work. You can prove this by seeing a medical practitioner and showing documentation of your injuries to SSDI representatives.

Then, your monthly income earned from work must not exceed the state limit. Finally, you must have paid Social Security taxes for a certain number of years (usually five in the last 10) to the SSA.

If you think you qualify for all three of these stipulations, you may be eligible for SSDI. You must pass recent work and duration of work tests to be eligible for SSDI. Non U.S.-citizens can qualify for SSDI if they are permanent residents and some alien residents can if they lawfully reside in the country.

If your disability improves over time and you wish to return to work, you can use the SSDI trial work period to see if your return to work is possible. If your disabilities still limit you too much to work, you can try again later. During the trial work period, a person receiving SSDI benefits can have unlimited income from work and still receive full benefits. There is no risk of termination, since the government wants to encourage people receiving SSDI to try to return to work.

How Much SSDI Will I Receive in Tennessee?

The SSDI program doesn’t limit the amount of unearned income you can have per month (such as SSI or other benefit programs), but it does limit the amount of money you earn through work. If you can earn an income, you aren’t considered disabled. If you are eligible to receive monthly SSDI benefits, the average amount for payments is $1,166 per month in 2016.

Your specific monthly SSDI benefit amount will vary based on your current income (from earned wages) as well as your needs. If you’re the sole provider for dependents, the SSA may increase your award. Speak to a Tennessee SSDI lawyer to learn more about your individual SSDI case and get a professional estimate about how much you might receive in benefits. If you apply for benefits online and are turned down, you can issue an appeal.

You have the right to legal representation during your SSDI application and appeal processes. Social Security works with our attorneys so you don’t have to pay lawyer fees without written consent from the SSA. Although the process to attain SSDI benefits is daunting, a practiced attorney by your side can make it much easier.

Contact us today to discuss our previous SSDI appeal cases and lawsuits. We can give you expert advice on the steps to take toward applying, appealing, and reapplying for SSDI benefits. Our attorneys will meet with you before your hearing to prep you for the process and ensure you feel confident in front of a judge.